A Guide to the Best Plastering Mixing Drills




Before going into the details, it may be necessary to clarify the difference between mixing drills and drilling tools used for plastering. The term plastering mixing drill is a different device. It can be a standalone mixer or a drill with a mixer paddle attached to it. This post focuses on the standalone mixer, which has its motor and a paddle for mixing.


In choosing a plastering mixing drill, there are three things you need to bear in mind: motor power, paddle size and design, and durability.



Motor power - A good mixer is one with a powerful enough motor to mix thick or heavy mixtures with ease. It does not have to match the rpm (revolutions per minute) of a drill. A 450 rpm can be good enough up to 200 pounds of mixture. However, if you will be working with heavier materials such as epoxy resin, cement lime, gypsum, and granulates, you may need a more powerful motor with around 560 rpm. Less powerful motors are generally cheaper. If you think you will only be working ordinary mixtures, you can go for the less expensive mixers. Otherwise, invest in a mixer with a more powerful motor.


Motor power - A good mixer is one with a powerful enough motor to mix thick or heavy mixtures with ease. It does not have to match the rpm (revolutions per minute) of a drill. A 450 rpm can be good enough up to 200 pounds of mixture. However, if you will be working with heavier materials such as epoxy resin, cement lime, gypsum, and granulates, you may need a more powerful motor with around 560 rpm. Less powerful motors are generally cheaper. If you think you will only be working ordinary mixtures, you can go for the less expensive mixers. Otherwise, invest in a mixer with a more powerful motor.


Paddle Size and Design- The paddle should neither be too big nor too small. The size must be just enough to induce mixing without overexerting the drill. If you use something excessively large, it will be difficult for the device to turn at the right speed. This can damage your drilling machine. If it’s too small, it would hardly mix the materials. On the other hand, the superior paddle design is something spiral, not one that looks like the those of hand mixers used in baking.

Durability and Protection - This one is a no-brainer. The plastering equipment you buy should endure the stress of being used for a reasonable period. The paddle should be made of durable material that is not prone to rust. Your tool does not have to be resistant to water dipping or splashes. An IP 20 rating is enough. This means that it should have effective protection against solid objects with a maximum size of 12.5mm.

Carefully examine your options as you purchase a mixing drill for plastering. Focus on reliability and suitability, not on the price. Alfra-Eibenstock have many mixing drills on offer that you can find on our website. If you already have your own drill, you don’t have to buy a standalone mixer. You can just buy a mixer paddle, which is available at Plasterers 1 Stop Shop.